Cryobanks for obtaining Donor Sperm and Processing Known Donor Sperm

Please note these are listed in alphabetical order not in order of recommendation

California Cryobank

www.cryobank.com
Los Angeles Office
310-443-5244
Fax: 310-443-5258
800-231-3373

Palo Alto Office

650-324-1900
Fax: 650-324-1946

Cambridge Office

617-497-8646
Fax: 617-497-6531

Genetics and IVF Institute

www.fairfaxcryobank.com
3015 Williams Dr.
Suite 110
Fairfax, VA 22031
703-698-3976
800-338-8407

Pacific Reproductive Services

www.pacrepro.com
888-469-5800
San Francisco: 415-487-2288
Pasadena 626-432-1681

Xytex

www.xytex.com
1100 Emmett St.
Augusta, GA 30904
706-733-0130

For IUI Cycles we recommend that our patients order:

2 ICI or IUI ready vials

  • ICI vials are not washed through gradient. These vials may contain more debris and dead sperm. However, they tend to be cheaper, and may have a higher count.
  • IUI ready vials are more expensive, they are washed through gradient to remove debris and most dead sperm, though they may have a slightly lower count.
**Regardless of vial type ALL vials are washed at IRMS prior to insemination with a simple wash procedure to remove cryoprotectant.

For IVF, we recommend that the patient order:

  • 2 vials of unwashed (ICI) donor eligible sperm.
  • IVF only or ART vials are NOT indicated for order (if they are the only vials remaining of that donor, consult with embryology before a patient orders them).

Delivery

Samples are accepted by the IRMS Andrology Lab via hand-delivery Monday-Friday, from 8 am-12 pm.

For samples that are shipped to IRMS directly from the Cryobank, they must be ordered for delivery between Monday-Thursday.

Important notes:

  1. IVF-only vials cannot be used for IUI.
  2. We do not recommend that our patients purchase sperm vials that were frozen before May of 2005, as this is when FDA regulations changed for “Donor Eligible” status. Vials frozen prior to 2005 are considered “Not Evaluated for Infectious Substances” due to lack of FDA required testing for SARS, West Nile Virus and Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, as well as a lack of infectious disease testing by NAT (nucleic-acid amplification).